blog post article on tips for travelers

Top Health Recommendation Tips for Travelers

Note: The following article was written by freelance writer, Emily Watts. Emily can be contacted at ewatts1986@gmail.com.

Tips for Travelers

Some of the most exciting places in the world are also places where you can contract the nastiest diseases. In today’s article, we present to you some health tips for travelers when going on vacation/holiday.

Vaccination for Travelers

 

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Immunization against Poliomyelitis

If you are planning an African safari, then you need immunization against poliomyelitis. This debilitating disease is still active in many parts of Africa and Asia. Its pathogens are spread through food, water and through an infected person. Even if you received a polio vaccine as a child, you might need to be re-immunized to make sure that you are protected from this pathogen.

Immunization against Typhoid Fever

Typhoid fever is a dangerous infection that is common in developing countries. It is caused by a bacterium that contaminates food and water. Many travelers fall ill with typhoid fever after visiting Asia, South America, and Africa. It is recommended you get a vaccination against typhoid fever, at least 1-2 weeks before traveling to these regions.

Anti-Tetanus Vaccine

Before going on a trip, make sure that you have been vaccinated against tetanus. Tetanus often occurs due to skin injuries, including frostbite, burns, and punctures. The culprit is a bacterium that is found in all corners of the world. Tetanus can be fatal. Usually, vaccinations are done every 10 years.

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Disease Precautions

Prevention of Travelers’ Diarrhea

Traveler’s diarrhea is the most common disease that occurs in half of all travelers. People who visit Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia are at greater risk. As a rule, this diarrhea is not dangerous and goes away by itself. And yet, you can take steps to prevent diarrhea, as well as severe forms of diarrhea since it is not fun to be unable to leave the hotel or do any work/studies. In the context of studies, in case you are a college student in need of academic aid, these websites contain valuable and student-friendly information. Back to diarrhea. Here are some health recommendations: avoid using tap water, foodstuff sold by street vendors, raw or under-served meat, seafood and raw fruits and vegetables.

Fruit and Vegetables

blog post article on tips for travelers

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You can eat fruit and vegetables abroad, except for small nuances. Avoid fruit and vegetables that you cannot clean yourself. Here are some crucial health guidelines: cook, peel and eat.

Water Purification

There are several ways for travelers to make local water safer. The safest method is boiling the water for a minute. If this is not possible, you can disinfect water with iodine pills, but this will not kill all the parasites. You can also purchase a portable water filter. If possible, buy bottled water, but make sure that it comes from a reliable source.

Antibiotics for Diarrhea

Even in spite of all precautions, there is still a risk that travelers may experience travelers’ diarrhea. If there is such a possibility, you can ask your doctor about taking safe antibiotics with you. With severe forms of diarrhea, you may need a course of antibiotics and a check for the presence of parasites.

Precautions against Dehydration

Traveling to countries with hot and dry climates exposes you to the risk of dehydration. This risk is even higher if you have diarrhea. Signs of dehydration include sunken eyes, dry mucous membranes, and rare urination. In this case, you may need medical means for oral rehydration.

Precautions against Sunburn

Nothing can spoil the fun of a trip but scorched skin. In addition to pain, ultraviolet rays and burns can lead to premature aging and an increased risk of skin cancer. Protect yourself using sunscreens with a wide range of protection means. Doctors also recommend staying in the shade or indoors between 10:00 am and 4:00 pm.

Pregnancy Precautions

Pregnancy does not mean that you cannot travel, but it is worth taking some precautions. We recommend you not travel to countries where there is malaria. In addition, it is necessary to adhere to the rules of safety in relation to foodstuff and water. If you are in the third trimester of pregnancy, make sure that there is a medical center nearby, in case of premature birth.

Precautions for Young Children

The best way to protect infants from diseases transmitted through water and foodstuff is breastfeeding while traveling. If this is not possible, make sure that you use water and baby food using boiled water or bottled water. If young children develop diarrhea, they may develop dehydration quickly and may require medical help.

First aid when traveling

You can buy ready-made first aid kits or compile it yourself. Make sure to get disposable gloves, shepherds of different sizes, gauze, antiseptics, cotton wool, scissors, elastic wrapping bandage, antifungal and antibacterial creams, antipruritic cream, aloe gel, saline drops, and medicines that you usually take along when traveling.

(Click here for the blog post article: The Effect of Massage on Skin Health and Regeneration.)

Did you know that Digital COMT (Digital Clinical Orthopedic Manual Therapy), Dr. Joe Muscolino’s video streaming subscription service for manual and movement therapists, has an entire folder on Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM)? Digital COMT adds seven new video lessons each and every week. And nothing ever goes away! Click here for more information.

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